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Joseph Moore

Young Comedy Billionaire

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Arguably the coolest comedian in the world – Joseph Moore is back, armed with his microphone, his sick-as-beats, and his laptop that hopefully won’t break between the time of writing this and the show.

Rumour has it this show is going to be at least an 8 out 10, both joke-wise and in looks.

“Super likeable and almost obnoxiously inoffensive” - Gatherandhunt.co.nz

Watch Joseph Moore's interview on FOUR Live here!

 

Showing In:

Auckland

Dates:

Tue 6 - Sat 10 May, 7.15pm

Venues:

The Basement Studio, Auckland

Tickets:

Adults $18.00
Conc. $15.00
Groups 8+ $15.00* service fees may apply

Bookings:

0800 TICKETEK (842 538)

Show Duration:

1 hour
 

Critics Review

Gather And Hunt'As in any grand, inspirational tale, in the end his obstacles are what help him succeed - in a kind of poetic, round about way. This ending is far more surprising and hilarious (and involves more questionable NZ musicians) than any realisation of traditional success would allow. Plus, it turns out Joseph’s a kind-hearted philanthropist and we didn’t go home empty-handed either... 'open/close
As you may guess, two thirds of Joseph Moore’s title ‘Young Comedy Billionaire’ is accurate, but it’s the remaining inaccurate (for now) third that really matters here. Courteney reviewed Joseph's show last year and dispels any uncertainties regarding just what his quest to live up to his role models may entail. However, while the same themes remain and her comments ring true, it would seem Joseph’s stepped his show up a notch for this year’s comedy festival.

As it’s title suggests Joseph’s show fills us in on his chase after a lifelong dream: to become a billionaire; to live like a baller. While he realises it’s a bit far-fetched from the outset, he’s still keen to chase the lifestyle it in whatever way he can. This includes dressing like Justin Bieber (downside: a lot of white laundry). As in any grand, inspirational tale, in the end his obstacles are what help him succeed - in a kind of poetic, round about way. This ending is far more surprising and hilarious (and involves more questionable NZ musicians) than any realisation of traditional success would allow. Plus, it turns out Joseph’s a kind-hearted philanthropist and we didn’t go home empty-handed either.

Joseph’s show is eclectic but surprisingly cohesive, each new turn either a call back to something familiar or somehow winding its way into the overall theme. From brilliantly familiar memories of school - where Joseph was also consumed by competitiveness - to contemplation on the seemingly adjustable wealth of Scrooge McDuck, Joseph's topics are diverse without ever seeming arbitrary. A few theatrical elements including a great (partly original/live) soundtrack and a slideshow only add to the cleverness of the show.

While a tiny technical hitch prompted a comment that he threw the slides together minutes before the show is disproven by its contents - it includes a pitch for a vegan, Bechdel-friendly remake of a Narnia film - which are clearly ingeniously planned. As for said hitch, Joseph’s reaction and recovery were admirable, although I’d be very intrigued to see just where that bit was headed. Safe to say those who find out can count themselves lucky.

If you’re not yet one of the lucky ones, I recommend you change that.

Read more:
http://www.gatherandhunt.co.nz/Stories/comedy-rr-young-comedy-billionaire
Joe Nunweek - pantograph-punch.com'Weak become heroes in Young Comedy Billionaire – it’s the best thing you could go see this week, an exceptional stand-up set that builds off his dream of being “NZ famous” and ends up world-class.'open/close
Joseph Moore has a wonderful face for comedy. I don’t mean by this that he’s some sort of rubberfaced gurner, but he can often look morose and lugubrious beyond his years, telling the stories of a 25-year-old with a hint of Louis CK’s world of worry behind them. His odd stoicism – look at those posters, scowling in front of the flag! – is key to Young Comedy Billionaire, an exceptional comedy set with a unity of theme and purpose you don’t often get in stand-up.

Hadley Donaldson’s No Limit-derived poster artwork should have indicated that the show would be built around Moore’s oft-broadcast love of hip-hop, but it doesn’t prepare you for how well this is handled. From start to finish, he intersperses the straight performance with portentous intros, triumphant outros, skits that pad out the time – ominous MIDI piano beats as he gives himself self-help monologues about being the greatest “NZ famous” comedian ever.

In the midst of recalling primary school sports with horrible alacrity, he observes that certificates and the right kind of big stick were the signs of wealth and success. Cue an amazing chopped n’screwed breakdown with a “Certificates n’ Sticks” refrain, a rap he can barely get out for laughing (he forgot the notes). Then there’s an Autotune moment at the end that’s technically ambitious, flirts with disaster, and has to be heard to be believed.

NZ stand-up’s history of playing with rap motifs is not distinguished (P-Funk Chainsaw). Where YCB succeeds is through Moore’s obvious love of the fun of self-mythologising and rags-to-riches redemption of rap, making it a fitting tie-in to a series of anecdotes elevated far beyond their mundane origins. Learning what car insurance is having smashed into a Holden Commodore first; cheating at cross-country; being accused of cyberbullying Six60; getting into Prince Caspian with the prestige role of “Bully #1” only to have all of his lines cut (gallingly, IMDB only describes him as “Boy #1” and he should do something about this). The interludes have his inner voice urging him to tell us a cool story: every time, he fails spectacularly. The emphasis being on ‘spectacularly’.

Though I’m loathe to give too much away, his use of the laptop is always clever and never too distracting. A dissertation on Forbes’ annual list of the five richest fictional characters turns into a slide-by-slide psychological horror where Moore can’t save the richest dog in the world (named “Todd Emerson” this evening, though audience participation will leave this up to you) from ruin. He avenges his excision from Prince Caspian with his own crude director’s cut, and it turns out to be building to the most incredible callback to an earlier joke, and the biggest laugh of the night. Even the one technical fuckup ended up actually being expertly timed, adding to the show’s strengths rather than undercutting them.

The last story is almost the most pitiful – Moore’s attempt to live like a baller in Berlin, expectations vs reality. It’s also the best, a cracking denouement that virtually ties the show up in a bow. Weak become heroes in Young Comedy Billionaire – it’s the best thing you could go see this week, an exceptional stand-up set that builds off his dream of being “NZ famous” and ends up world-class.

Check out the original article here: http://pantograph-punch.com/review-joseph-moore-young-comedy-billionaire/
Matt Baker - Theatrescenes.co.nz'Moore himself may not be financially rich, the humour in his show is affluent, and certainly deserves a merited certificate in achievement.'open/close
Comedian Joseph Moore is not a billionaire, but that hasn’t prevented him from living as close as he can to a ‘New Zealand famous’ lifestyle. From his school days to his Twitter feed, Moore explores not only his want of fame, but also his attempts for people to like him in the process. The second part is not a hard sell. Moore’s affable personality, nervous energy, and somewhat disloyal inner monologue are all components which all work in his favour.

Moore’s technical support provides excellent visual aids as he considers the conundrum of fictional wealth and his status as a film actor. Having admittedly completed some of these technical components 10 minutes prior to doors opening, there are some inevitable hitches on opening night. Moore, however, takes them in stride, cheekily suggests we come back another night to see the whole show, and ploughs onward.

The concepts of wealth and admiration are ironically incongruous, as Moore’s anecdotes present us with a person who, in the aim of searching for approval, lives the balls out lifestyle of a billionaire who plays by his own rules. While Moore himself may not be financially rich, the humour in his show is affluent, and certainly deserves a merited certificate in achievement.

Read more:
http://www.theatrescenes.co.nz/review-joseph-moore-young-comedy-billionaire-nz-international-comedy-festival-2014/
Rachel McKinnon - Keepingupwithnz.com'4 Stars - He is part of a new wave of young comedians who are writing comedy relevant to kids of the 80s and 90s... 'open/close
Joseph Moore enters the stage at The Basement Studio for Young Comedy Billionaire as if he were a comic performing live at the Apollo, London. The lighting is slick, there are sound cues, voice overs, a sweet PowerPoint presentation and two mics. And they aren’t just smoke and mirrors; Moore is the best young Kiwi comic you haven’t heard of yet.

A Billy T finalist in 2013, Moore is also a core member of Fanfiction Comedy who are storming the comedy circuit reading their fangirl and fanboy mash-up tales on popular culture. Their comedy writing is second to none in this country, and Young Comedy Billionaire has the same sharp writing, with seemingly effortless, self-deprecating delivery.

He is part of a new wave of young comedians who are writing comedy relevant to kids of the 80s and 90s. Scrooge McDuck, Kanye West, working at Subway, restricted licences, Drake’s new album and school certificates feature in a set that, while not clean, will delight just about anyone.

Young Comedy Billionaire has steady momentum, great energy, and a refreshing sense of optimism. Put simply, Moore’s hilarious, as per usual.

Read more:
http://keepingupwithnz.com/2014/05/07/joseph-moore-the-basement-studio/

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